Bruno Rosada
There is something in the painting of Josine Dupont that recalls the Hostages of Fautrier. However, the years do not go by in vain and history evolves. In these paintings by Josine Dupont, there is a more-or-less conscious reference to the great French master, as well as a very precise overtaking. This reference is due to the human condition of being an existential “hostage” which has been happening here in Europe now for at least two centuries (say, from the end of the Enlightenment) at a social and cultural level and which, more than half a century after Fautrier, today still inevitably produces an effect immediately derived from current taste and quite rightly leads to a connotative aspect of art. Also, the discovery of the significance and meaning of matter (in the specific sense of Dorfles’ “matter used as a means of expression”), from then on, shows them primarily as a positive consequence of the formless. This is one of these connotative aspects that, from the experience of Fautrier, branched out to be a characteristic feature of a whole mentality of art: tachisme, art autre and action painting are all contextual forms that have never denied their affinity with the Formless, to give it its proper name. All this is assimilated into the painting of Josine Dupont, but there is, and there could not not be, something substantially different, which is a significant step forward in resolving those problems: the recovery of matter in another form. The problem is now always the same: how to get back to the real world without retracing your steps on the roads that have already been travelled so far and which are now definitely impassable.
Then matter takes on all its philosophical, Aristotelian meaning. In this perspective, the compositional structure assumes a highly significant importance: twisted fragments of intersecting planes, variously articulated and modulated planes, bits of surfaces that hover in midair, straight and curved lines, and blotches and indistinct shapes. The precariousness of the shapes gives sense to the precariousness of existence that has become its supporting structure. Matter is no longer what a work is made of, like for Fautrier, but is what the work represents. For twentieth-century formlessness, matter and reality do not exist: in reality, there is more emptiness than fullness, and the appearance of things was a trick. Today Josine Dupont recovers things under their fascinating shapeless (not formless) appearance and allows you to glimpse their substantial shape, figures made out by intuition, and precarious existences. The triumph of the existence of the real thus occurs in its most human everyday forms, surpassing reality in forms that still retain an indelible trace of it, so making clear the absolute autonomy of creativity. In the various moments, which do not follow each other chronologically, but overlap like stratigraphic sequences of an investigation into reality, a kind of core-sampling of the world’s knowledge through art forms, the extraordinary artistic ability of Josine Dupont, combined with a strong personal sensitivity, suggests an itinerary of the new roads to be travelled: not a return to the figure, but to the use of the figure.

Bruno Rosada
There is something in the painting of Josine Dupont that recalls the Hostages of Fautrier. However, the years do not go by in vain and history evolves. In these paintings by Josine Dupont, there is a more-or-less conscious reference to the great French master, as well as a very precise overtaking. This reference is due to the human condition of being an existential “hostage” which has been happening here in Europe now for at least two centuries (say, from the end of the Enlightenment) at a social and cultural level and which, more than half a century after Fautrier, today still inevitably produces an effect immediately derived from current taste and quite rightly leads to a connotative aspect of art. Also, the discovery of the significance and meaning of matter (in the specific sense of Dorfles’ “matter used as a means of expression”), from then on, shows them primarily as a positive consequence of the formless. This is one of these connotative aspects that, from the experience of Fautrier, branched out to be a characteristic feature of a whole mentality of art: tachisme, art autre and action painting are all contextual forms that have never denied their affinity with the Formless, to give it its proper name. All this is assimilated into the painting of Josine Dupont, but there is, and there could not not be, something substantially different, which is a significant step forward in resolving those problems: the recovery of matter in another form. The problem is now always the same: how to get back to the real world without retracing your steps on the roads that have already been travelled so far and which are now definitely impassable.

Then matter takes on all its philosophical, Aristotelian meaning. In this perspective, the compositional structure assumes a highly significant importance: twisted fragments of intersecting planes, variously articulated and modulated planes, bits of surfaces that hover in midair, straight and curved lines, and blotches and indistinct shapes. The precariousness of the shapes gives sense to the precariousness of existence that has become its supporting structure. Matter is no longer what a work is made of, like for Fautrier, but is what the work represents. For twentieth-century formlessness, matter and reality do not exist: in reality, there is more emptiness than fullness, and the appearance of things was a trick. Today Josine Dupont recovers things under their fascinating shapeless (not formless) appearance and allows you to glimpse their substantial shape, figures made out by intuition, and precarious existences. The triumph of the existence of the real thus occurs in its most human everyday forms, surpassing reality in forms that still retain an indelible trace of it, so making clear the absolute autonomy of creativity. In the various moments, which do not follow each other chronologically, but overlap like stratigraphic sequences of an investigation into reality, a kind of core-sampling of the world’s knowledge through art forms, the extraordinary artistic ability of Josine Dupont, combined with a strong personal sensitivity, suggests an itinerary of the new roads to be travelled: not a return to the figure, but to the use of the figure.

Vittorio Sgarbi
The belgian in Milan – based artist Josine Dupont Pareto Spinola thoroughly surprised me with her currently set of works. It is my honor to have curated her show “Metaphysics of form” represents a variety of works spanning from pessimistic portraits with envied communication skills, to more complex depictions, always tackeling the dissolution of form in connection with the human body. In focus is the “dissolution”, rather than “metaphysics” as she call it, than despite being the right concept from the philosophical points of view; it is rather unambiguous when you consider the metaphysical printing se of De Chirico and Carrà.
A more precise definition for her works lines in the abstract propensity of the figurative.
Figurazione displays and veils the real traits of a Subject,  though it always remains visibile in some sorta of form, whether it is suggested or o virus.  The form itself only displays its essence, which indicates a possible whole. During the years of her artistic maturity, Dupont rigorously researched on the essence of figurative form, which encouraged her to depict on its mere appearance.
The artist uses different techniques retracting different forms of the human body. by adding colour to the forms, she finds ways to make her figures alive.

Through applying monochrome colours or just two sets of colours, the figures adapt different forms of movement. By adding brighter and livelier colours she establishes a balance between abstraction and figuration, which becomes her most successful acronym.
Visible in her work are antecedents such as Scialoja, but she reflects an obvious stubbornness to show what painting seems to hide through rarefaction. Another artist that appears to be in relation with her work is de Pisis, who recalled sensitivity and taste in extraordinary abstract forms by depicting gestures. Dupont reflects traits of this, what de Pisis communicated, in a more extreme synthesis.
By looking at her works one immidiately identifies the uneasieness of recognition, though by longer reading one slowly drifts into the depths of the painting and so begins to rediscover the youth, the female figure, the unmade bed.
Persistant in her work is the desire to see what lies beyond appearances.
Hence, the name of the exhibition “Metaphysics of form” expresses the idea of trying on a philosophical noumenon, rather than a phenomenon, which is more of a concept than the represented reality. Her work was a research project with an almost mystical dimension, just like an uprise to an absolute form, or simply a form of mystical rise.

Vittorio Sgarbi
The belgian in Milan – based artist Josine Dupont Pareto Spinola thoroughly surprised me with her currently set of works. It is my honor to have curated her show “Metaphysics of form” represents a variety of works spanning from pessimistic portraits with envied communication skills, to more complex depictions, always tackeling the dissolution of form in connection with the human body. In focus is the “dissolution”, rather than “metaphysics” as she call it, than despite being the right concept from the philosophical points of view; it is rather unambiguous when you consider the metaphysical printing se of De Chirico and Carrà.
A more precise definition for her works lines in the abstract propensity of the figurative.
Figurazione displays and veils the real traits of a Subject,  though it always remains visibile in some sorta of form, whether it is suggested or o virus.  The form itself only displays its essence, which indicates a possible whole. During the years of her artistic maturity, Dupont rigorously researched on the essence of figurative form, which encouraged her to depict on its mere appearance.
The artist uses different techniques retracting different forms of the human body. by adding colour to the forms, she finds ways to make her figures alive.

Through applying monochrome colours or just two sets of colours, the figures adapt different forms of movement. By adding brighter and livelier colours she establishes a balance between abstraction and figuration, which becomes her most successful acronym.
Visible in her work are antecedents such as Scialoja, but she reflects an obvious stubbornness to show what painting seems to hide through rarefaction. Another artist that appears to be in relation with her work is de Pisis, who recalled sensitivity and taste in extraordinary abstract forms by depicting gestures. Dupont reflects traits of this, what de Pisis communicated, in a more extreme synthesis.
By looking at her works one immidiately identifies the uneasieness of recognition, though by longer reading one slowly drifts into the depths of the painting and so begins to rediscover the youth, the female figure, the unmade bed.
Persistant in her work is the desire to see what lies beyond appearances.
Hence, the name of the exhibition “Metaphysics of form” expresses the idea of trying on a philosophical noumenon, rather than a phenomenon, which is more of a concept than the represented reality. Her work was a research project with an almost mystical dimension, just like an uprise to an absolute form, or simply a form of mystical rise.

Fabio Bianchi
The formless was born in Europe after World War II, but no one knows where or how. We only know that today, even if it is coming to an end, it still expresses great interior suffering. Many painters – such as Josine Dupont Pareto, the subject of the personal show, “Metaphysics of Form”, at the Jelmoni Studio – feel as if that initial climate of uncertainty has continued basically unchanged up until today. Here, Dupont is exhibiting her latest production: canvases with impressive colour and visual impact, with strong gestures, emphasized texture, a swirl of feelings and passions. They are not reworkings of originals from a long time ago, and they always send out a frenetic rhythm, emphasizing personal suffering, portraying a situation that is difficult, if not impossible, to understand.
Undifferentiated spaces predominate, with pigment masses, and surfaces which are so rough that everything becomes

undifferentiated and you lose all memory, and everything turns into a mysterious geography of the spirit, hovering between conceptualism and unconscious sedimentation.
The various works, which are quite distinct from each other, seem like sudden appearances of moods that slowly take on their own “strange” atypical features. We must remember that DuPont has recently worked on sketches and watercolours which, while recalling the hard power of Schiele, remind us that every human being is alone and helpless, at the mercy of Fate. At the opening, the performance, “Symbolic Dynamics”, by Manicomicsteatro was important, and aimed at highlighting, among other things, a fundamental aspect of metaphysics: where the five senses receive impressions coming from the outside but are not able to describe them rationally, as confirmed by the reading of passages by Aristotle, St. Augustine, Baudelaire, Calvino….

Fabio Bianchi
The formless was born in Europe after World War II, but no one knows where or how. We only know that today, even if it is coming to an end, it still expresses great interior suffering. Many painters – such as Josine Dupont Pareto, the subject of the personal show, “Metaphysics of Form”, at the Jelmoni Studio – feel as if that initial climate of uncertainty has continued basically unchanged up until today. Here, Dupont is exhibiting her latest production: canvases with impressive colour and visual impact, with strong gestures, emphasized texture, a swirl of feelings and passions. They are not reworkings of originals from a long time ago, and they always send out a frenetic rhythm, emphasizing personal suffering, portraying a situation that is difficult, if not impossible, to understand.
Undifferentiated spaces predominate, with pigment masses, and surfaces which are so rough that everything becomes

undifferentiated and you lose all memory, and everything turns into a mysterious geography of the spirit, hovering between conceptualism and unconscious sedimentation.
The various works, which are quite distinct from each other, seem like sudden appearances of moods that slowly take on their own “strange” atypical features. We must remember that DuPont has recently worked on sketches and watercolours which, while recalling the hard power of Schiele, remind us that every human being is alone and helpless, at the mercy of Fate. At the opening, the performance, “Symbolic Dynamics”, by Manicomicsteatro was important, and aimed at highlighting, among other things, a fundamental aspect of metaphysics: where the five senses receive impressions coming from the outside but are not able to describe them rationally, as confirmed by the reading of passages by Aristotle, St. Augustine, Baudelaire, Calvino….

Salvatore Russo
The lines in Josine Dupont’s paintings break down and take on the typical traits of the “re-defined.” Well away from figurative painting that finds its best form of expression in pleasing the eye, the artist embarks on a new journey that puts her among the best interpreters of Italian Formless Art. Her painting narrative takes on archetypical meanings which see their truest solution in the signifier. She is an artist of undoubted expressive and emotional ability, using her work to explore today’s realities. Undrawn geometric lines, boundaries of the soul, yet-to-be-defined universes, and
parallel realities are the elements to be found in her work. The language of colour becomes more refined, favouring intense tones as the basis?of the painting. The strokes are ever more incisive and wide, so that the brushstrokes seem to scratch into the canvas to see what it is hiding. “Non-places’ become places for investigation, new corners to explore with a humble desire to learn and to take on something different. A kind of painting that springs from the instinctive perception and deep emotions of Josine Dupont, and that allows us to know the great introspective capacity of this talented valuable artist.

Salvatore Russo
The lines in Josine Dupont’s paintings break down and take on the typical traits of the “re-defined.” Well away from figurative painting that finds its best form of expression in pleasing the eye, the artist embarks on a new journey that puts her among the best interpreters of Italian Formless Art. Her painting narrative takes on archetypical meanings which see their truest solution in the signifier. She is an artist of undoubted expressive and emotional ability, using her work to explore today’s realities. Undrawn geometric lines, boundaries of the soul, yet-to-be-defined universes, and

parallel realities are the elements to be found in her work. The language of colour becomes more refined, favouring intense tones as the basis?of the painting. The strokes are ever more incisive and wide, so that the brushstrokes seem to scratch into the canvas to see what it is hiding. “Non-places’ become places for investigation, new corners to explore with a humble desire to learn and to take on something different. A kind of painting that springs from the instinctive perception and deep emotions of Josine Dupont, and that allows us to know the great introspective capacity of this talented valuable artist.

Elena Putti
Josine Dupont is an artist who is as multi-faceted as her works. Born in Milan and now living in Genoa, her special quality is an intense deeply-intimate vision that makes her study of both human and natural forms very vibrant. Her artistic research, based on a rejection of pre-definitions, gives rise to complex perspectives in which the different spatial planes merge into a single vision. There have been several different periods in her artistic career that have unfolded as a gradual breaking down of forms. Josine Dupont’s early works are dominated by human figures: bodies in sinuous movements are quickly outlined by quick incisive strokes and their twisted and precarious positions point to a dramatic fragility that gives pathos to the nude. In these works, colour is used as a chiaroscuro contrast to accompany the sinuous forms by giving depth and life. In her more mature works, the artist explores the theme of movement through the breaking down of the visual planes. Near and far are combined by means of rapid fleeting brushstrokes, like heartbeats that give a pulse that leads to a complete fusion between subject and object.
In her latest works, the perception of the object becomes more and more formless, revealing perspectives that are already close to abstraction. The colour background always seems to be apparently homogeneous but, however, hides alternating areas of textures, with pauses for colour with almost no body. The shades of colour are always the artist’s favourites: heavy and intense blues, reds and purples that give us the synthesis of a reality that is lively and full of bright contrasts and harmonic decompositions. In the exhibition, which Satura has set up in the Sala Colonna of its headquarters, 19 of the artist’s works are on show. For the occasion, Josine has chosen to show a collection of drawings of sinuous forms of nude figures which clearly reveal her style. There are only a few colours but they are applied with delicate skill, bringing out the depth and dynamism of the bodies. Predominately black lines outline the subjects and are sometimes harsh and decisive and, at other times, soft and fuzzy. This is a show where you can immediately understand the lines that have always been a feature of the artist and recognize the dominant themes in recent abstract works.

Elena Putti
Josine Dupont is an artist who is as multi-faceted as her works. Born in Milan and now living in Genoa, her special quality is an intense deeply-intimate vision that makes her study of both human and natural forms very vibrant. Her artistic research, based on a rejection of pre-definitions, gives rise to complex perspectives in which the different spatial planes merge into a single vision. There have been several different periods in her artistic career that have unfolded as a gradual breaking down of forms. Josine Dupont’s early works are dominated by human figures: bodies in sinuous movements are quickly outlined by quick incisive strokes and their twisted and precarious positions point to a dramatic fragility that gives pathos to the nude. In these works, colour is used as a chiaroscuro contrast to accompany the sinuous forms by giving depth and life. In her more mature works, the artist explores the theme of movement through the breaking down of the visual planes. Near and far are combined by means of rapid fleeting brushstrokes, like heartbeats that give a pulse that leads to a complete fusion between subject and object.

In her latest works, the perception of the object becomes more and more formless, revealing perspectives that are already close to abstraction. The colour background always seems to be apparently homogeneous but, however, hides alternating areas of textures, with pauses for colour with almost no body. The shades of colour are always the artist’s favourites: heavy and intense blues, reds and purples that give us the synthesis of a reality that is lively and full of bright contrasts and harmonic decompositions. In the exhibition, which Satura has set up in the Sala Colonna of its headquarters, 19 of the artist’s works are on show. For the occasion, Josine has chosen to show a collection of drawings of sinuous forms of nude figures which clearly reveal her style. There are only a few colours but they are applied with delicate skill, bringing out the depth and dynamism of the bodies. Predominately black lines outline the subjects and are sometimes harsh and decisive and, at other times, soft and fuzzy. This is a show where you can immediately understand the lines that have always been a feature of the artist and recognize the dominant themes in recent abstract works.

  • it
  • en
Order is the pleasure of the rationality, but disorder is the delight of the imagination. (Paul Claudel)